Subject Codes &
Course Descriptions

Course Description By Faculty

This course will explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from a variety of physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics may include companion animals, animal rights and welfare, animals and food and entertainment, human animal violence, and animal-assisted therapy. (Can be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit).

Supervised practicum in professional development in pilot training. Introduction to leadership training, and aviation theory and practice. Includes a three-day leadership training session held just prior to the Fall term. Completion of year one of pilot training plus submission of satisfactory portfolio entries to the supervising instructor required. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. Two-semester course. 6 credits. Restricted to students in LAPS Pilot option program.)

This course examines how various academic disciplines contribute to integrative understanding. The course examines the history of interdisciplinary studies and different models of integration. Students will develop skills in interdisciplinary research and problem solving, in oral and written communication, and in the synthesis of diverse perspectives. (Open only to students in the I.A.S. program).

An overview of major themes, concepts and issues that inform the field of Canadian communication studies. Topics may include: the political, economic, historical, and cultural contexts of communication; new media; policy issues and concerns; representation; the role of media in the social construction of reality and the broad interaction between media and society. (2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week)

Students investigate the local and global origins of a contemporary social problem through the eyes of social justice activists. Students will assess the strengths and limitations of strategies and theoretical frameworks for social change and use this knowledge to create social action messages that raise public awareness, influence government or corporate policy, or positively change attitudes and behaviours. (3 lecture hours per week) (Also offered as Social Justice Studies SJST 1000.)

Introduction to the Process of Theatre and Performance Studies. Several of the following topics will be covered: play and performance analysis; genre and style; alternative articulations of performance; theories and process of production design; a survey of technical practices; and communication and collaboration. Introduction to Theatre and Performance Studies is a two-part sequence, required for majors in all School of Dramatic Art programs. A laboratory assignment supporting the production schedule of University Players is required for DRAM-1000 This course must be successfully completed in the first year of the program. (Laboratory hours by arrangement). (Open to non-majors)

Introductory course in the theory and practice of drawing for the theatre with practical, historical and aesthetic aspects. This is a skills development course that involves the exploration of a variety of concepts, techniques and media used for visual expression. Emphasis is placed on observation, spacial relationships and effective visual communication in a two-dimensional format. This course must be completed by all BA(H) and DRAMACOMM in their first year. Open to non-drama majors.

An introduction to the study and practice of voice and speech for the theatre. (Corequisites: DRAM 1260, DRAM 1280) (Restricted to B.F.A. Acting students only.) (Laboratory hours by arrangement.)

An introduction to the study and practice of movement for the actor. (Corequisites: DRAM 1200, DRAM 1280.) (Restricted to B.F.A. Acting students only.) (Laboratory hours by arrangement.)

An introduction to the study and practice of acting with an emphasis on the basic elements of improvisation. (Corequisites: DRAM 1200, DRAM 1260.) (Restricted to B.F.A. Acting students only.) (Laboratory hours by arrangement.)

Critical approaches to the main elements of Greek and Roman theatre, medieval western and Asian theatre, Italian, Spanish and English Renaissance Theatre (Open to non-Dramatic Art majors.)

An introduction to the principles, theories and applications of Drama in Education and Community with an emphasis on creativity, storytelling, and the developmental aspects of play. (Restricted to Drama in Education and Community majors or consent of instructor.)

An introduction to the analysis of literary genres: poetry, drama, and prose fiction. (Prerequisite: Grade 12 "U" French or Francais, or equivalent) (Note: FREN 1410 is a prerequisite course for all literature courses in French Studies.)

A study of norms and functions of the French verb system, nouns, pronouns, and modifiers. Oral practice, pronunciation and composition. (Prerequisite: Grade 12 "U" French or Francais, or equivalent.) (Antirequisite: any previous 2000-level French language training courses.)

A study and practice of behavioural skills such as active listening, conflict resolution, running effective meetings, addressing ethics, etc., relevant to the film industry. A team environment will be used as we study interpersonal dynamics as they relate to roles in film production.

An introduction to analyzing and writing about literary texts, focusing on the major genres (poetry, drama, and narrative prose), the use of literary terms, and frequent writing assignments in practical criticism. (Not available on an audit basis.) (Restricted to majors in English and IAS only.)

A practical study of the fundamentals of acting experienced through acting exercises. (Not open to BFA Acting students.)

A survey of representative texts to 1750: The Medieval, Renaissance, seventeenth-century and eighteenth-century periods. (Restricted to majors in English and IAS only.) Credit cannot be obtained for both ENGL-1003 and ENGL-2109.

An investigation of a variety of drawing processes, materials and concepts in a studio environment that fosters personal exploration and expression. (Lab fees may apply.)

An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of time-based arts including digital media. Students will gain knowledge of the creative possibilities of emerging technologies and will develop a basic understanding of methods, tools and techniques of time-based media.

This course illustrates and account for the position of women in Canadian society. We explore how gender identities are informed by the process of social construction which privileges some women while disadvantaging others.

This course examines a diverse range of women's friendships. Through discussion, reading, and films we will explore topics such as the meaning of friendship for women, how women's friendships have been portrayed in literature and film, the link between friendship and social activism for women, and the political meanings of women's friendship in cultures resistant to woman-centered consciousness. (Can be taken for Social Science or Arts credit.)

This course uses the students' own experiences of work to examine the economic, social, and psychological significance of paid and unpaid work in Canadian society, the tasks and values assigned to various kinds of work, and the relationship between work and living standards.

Introduction to selected areas in psychology including developmental, social, personality, and clinical.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of labour and social movements with an emphasis on understanding current developments and issues and the roles of labour in promoting change in the social, economic, political, and environmental conditions of workers, women, gays and lesbians, minorities, students, and the poor.

This course examines a broad cross-section of historical and contemporary representations of western women in popular culture, and visual media - photographs, film and video, the fine arts, and advertising. The student will be introduced to feminist and gender-related theories of representation. (Can be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit.)

An introduction to the fundamental skills and critical concepts of visual perception and production common to all areas of two-dimensional image-making. Basic principles of composition and design, light and pigment-based colour theory, as these apply to painting, photo-based processes, and print production. Their use and application will be will be explored within the contemporary art context. Class projects may involve interdisciplinarity between these media. Studio assignments are combined with related critical theory, historical practice and current strategies. The lab is intended to introduce students to design concept of form, space, composition, in two and three dimensions, and how they relate to human experiences. Students are introduced to the principles of design and the design process as a foundation for architectural design. (6 lecture hours and 6 laboratory hours per week.) (6.0 unit course) (Credit will not be granted for VABE 1060 if taken subsequently to VABE 1100.) (Restricted to students in the Visual Arts and the Built Environment program.)

Readings and discussion, in English, of topics from the history and culture of Spain.

This intensive language-training course combines the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of Spanish.) (Antirequisites: SPAN 1010.)

This course will introduce students to the key concepts, theories, and methods appropriate to Sociology and Criminology. Focus will be on application of issues important to studying social life using multiple perspectives while exercising the sociological imagination. Topics may include discussion of culture, gender, social stratification, race and ethnicity, family, and crime and deviance.

Introduction to selected areas in psychology including learning, perception, physiological psychology, emotion, and motivation. (3 lecture hours a week.)

An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of space-based art, including but not limited to sculpture and installation. Using traditional and contemporary materials, processes and practices, students will gain knowledge and experience through the exploration of the creative possibilities of three-dimensional space.

This course examines the historical, philosophical and political aspects of the development and delivery of the Canadian social welfare system. Special attention will be focused on ways to identify and assess the needs of, and services to, vulnerable populations within the context of social and cultural diversity.

An Introduction to Architecture is offered to first-year VABE students to create awareness of the profession of architecture. The course looks at: the history of the profession; how architecture is practised; how the profession is changing; current issues with the architectural profession; and ethical concerns facing a practitioner today. The course gives students a broad-based background into architecture before they have an opportunity to be engaged in practice. (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.) (Open to Visual Arts and the Built Environment (VABE) students only.)

Readings and discussion, in English, of topics from the history and culture of Spanish America.

This course examines the ways in which social workers in generalist practice intervene to meet the needs of clients within the Canadian social welfare system. Attention will be paid to the development of an understanding of generalist social work practice within an ecological and systems perspective. This course provides an introduction to social work processes. Attention will be given to the needs of vulnerable and marginalized populations within traditional and alternative social work perspectives such as ecological, systems, strengths, feminist, and anti-oppressive practice. Students will gain an understanding of personal, professional, agency, and societal needs and values and how they influence social work practice. Students will be introduced to the generalist social work practice perspective within a problem-solving process that includes focused assessment, intervention, termination, and evaluation of practice. Ethical and professional issues such as confidentiality and accountability will be introduced.

An introduction to the fundamental skills and critical concepts of visual perception and production common to all areas of two-dimensional image making. Basic principles of composition and design, light and pigment-based colour theory, as these apply to painting, photo-based processes, and print production. Their use and application will be explored within the contemporary art context. Class projects may involve interdisciplinarity between these media. Studio assignments are combined with related critical theory, historical practice and current strategies. (Lab fees may apply.)

An introduction to the politics and government of Canada. The course will focus on political culture, the constitution, federalism, the executive, parliament, public service, courts, political parties, interest groups, and elections. (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

An examination of competing perspectives on international relations and of such critical themes as power, security, war, imperialism, nationalism, interdependence, development and underdevelopment, human rights, environmental concerns, and the quest for a new world order. (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

Introduces students to issues such as democracy, authoritarianism, nationalism, political culture, and how political power is organized. The course focuses on the democratic states of the West, but also examines non-democratic states such as China and the transitional democracies of Eastern Europe. (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

An explanation of, and practice in, the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes which are essential components of reasoning well. Topics include: the role of language; evaluating sources (including from the internet); analyzing, evaluating and diagramming arguments; inference strength; writing an extended piece of reasoning. (Antirequisite: PHIL-1620.) (1.5 lecture, 1.5 lab hour per week)

A philosophical inquiry into one or more of the more important contemporary cultural forms and phenomena. Topics may vary and may include popular music, television, virtual reality, sexual roles and stereotypes, or other topics.

A critical examination of philosophical arguments about controversial moral issues. Readings will be chosen by the instructor on issues connected with one or several areas such as: biomedical ethics, euthanasia, suicide, environmental ethics, the treatment of animals, war and violence, pornography, censorship. Some non-Western Philosophical sources may be used.

What is human nature? How do we think of ourselves as human beings? The focus of the course will be theories of human nature that have been put forward in Western philosophy. Some non-Western Philosophical sources may be used.

Intensive drills in ear training, sight singing, dictation, and basic keyboard. (Admission by examination or consent of the instructor.) (Should be taken concurrently with MUSC 1120) (1.50 credit hour course.) 

An introduction to the philosophical, sociological, and historical foundations of teaching music. The nature and value of music education will be examined through discourse and reflective thought, with an emphasis on developing critical thinking skills and building a framework for a personal philosophy of music education. (Prerequisite: enrolment in the B.Mus., B.A. (Music) degrees, or permission of the instructor.) 

An introduction to foundational concepts and approaches in the study of human geography, emphasizing the way social, political, economic, and environmental systems shape and are shaped by patterns of geographic and spatial organization.

The cultural traditions of Italy from the Renaissance to modern times. (Taught in English.)

An overview of the major events and movements during the second half of the "short" twentieth century. The course will broadly explore the world-wide impact of the Cold War, communism, decolonization, globalization, terrorism, etc. The geographical focus of the material will vary with the instructor. (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week. 

An introduction to the cultural values and achievements of the ancient Greeks. Topics will include geography, history, mythology and religion, language and literature, art and daily life. (Recommended for prospective Greek and Roman Studies majors.)

The cultural traditions of Italy from early times to the end of the Middle Ages. (Taught in English.)

This intensive language-training course combined the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of Italian)

This course is specifically designed to introduce third year history students to a case study in historiography. Each time it is taught, the instructor 's specialization will be the theme, and he or she will outline the various historiographical approaches to that theme.

An overview of the major events and movements during the first half of the 'short' 20th century. The course will broadly explore the global impact of the world wars, communism, fascism, colonialism, the Great Depression, etc. The geographical focus of the material will vary with the instructor. (3 lecture hours or 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

This course looks at the different forms of contact between Europeans and the rest of the world during the Middle Ages, focusing on conflict and coexistence with Islam. It will consider exchanges between civilizations, whether of an economic, cultural, artistic or spiritual nature. Topics include: Muslim Spain, the Crusades, the Ottoman Empire and Venice.

This course is specifically designed for first-semester history majors, to introduce them to the history department, different kinds of historical inquiry, and the basics of historical research. Further, it is designed to create a cohort of the new history majors, both through participating in this class together and by working in small groups.

A thematic examination of a single social historical topic in Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

A study of the art and craft of film production through lectures and hands-on exercises. A survey of the stages of production, key artistic roles, and concepts of visualization and cinematic storytelling. (2 lecture hours and 1 laboratory hour per week.)

This course will explore current political, cultural and social contexts. The perceived gulf between the "ivory tower" and the "real world" will be bridged each week as we analyze major current issues with attention to popular culture. (Restricted to year 1 FAHSS majors.) (3 lecture/1 tutorial hours a week.) (6.0 credit course.)

A foundational course aimed at developing effective writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, paragraph writing conventions, academic learning, and critical thinking. This is a hybrid course.

A continuation of GART 1500 aimed at developing and refining writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, essay writing conventions, research skills, scholarly citations, editing and revising, academic learning, and critical thinking. This is a hybrid course. (Prerequisite: GART 1500.) 

Designed to equip the beginner with the basic skills needed for reading ancient Greek literature, including the New Testament.

This intensive, language training course combines the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of German.)

An interdisciplinary introduction to political, social, and cultural developments in Germanic lands before 1815. (Taught in English. New prerequisites. May be repeated more than once if content changes.)

An interdisciplinary introduction to political, social, and cultural developments in Germanic lands from 1815 onward. (Taught in English. No prerequisites. May be repeated more than once if content changes.)

An introduction to concepts and techniques of mathematics useful in business situations. Topics include mathematical modeling of qualitative scenarios; linear simultaneous equations; inequalities; exponential and logarithmic functions; graphical linear programming; and probability. (Prerequisite: Any grade 12 "U" math course, or MATH 1780). (This course is intended for students in Business Administration only. May not be taken for credit in any program within the Faculty of Science.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

Research has shown that effective communication skills are as necessary to career advancement as technical competence, work experience and academic qualifications. The importance of communication skills is not surprising when you consider that the average business manager spends 75-80% of the day communicating in one form or another. Thus, the focus of this course is to help you to sharpen your ability to communicate and manage conflict effectively - with individuals, within small groups, and with large audiences. This course stresses practical skill building for leaders. Time is spent on communication concepts and techniques, planning, organizing, and making presentations, as well as the application of behavioural science theory to business communication and leadership. (Prerequisite or corequisite: STEN-1000) (Not open to non-Business students.)

An introduction to the principles, concepts and techniques of marketing. A significant objective of the course is the development of a basic understanding of the marketing process and its role in the organization, in the economy, and in global markets.

This course takes a holistic approach in helping students develop an understanding of their future places, as entry level managers, in business and other forms of organizations. Functional business learning is undertaken using the lecture method. In parallel, the basic elements of strategic management are introduced in order to develop students' strategic thinking capabilities. Project work focuses on adapting students' career strategies to the employment environment, and on adapting companies' strategies to their competitive environments. Finally, the case method is used to emphasize ethical self management, group dynamics and organizational governance, and entrepreneurial processes involved in starting and managing a small business. The course demands that students: use their initiative; develop their analytical, decision making and interpersonal management skills; and take responsibility for achieving success.

This course provides students with directed field experience in a school classroom during each of the Fall and Winter semesters. Workshops and seminars will provide an orientation to schools, with a focus on school culture and school community. An initial teaching portfolio will be developed as a means of documenting and reflecting on professional learning and practice.

Overview of the engineering profession: fields, career development, sustainability, health and safety, relation to society, business and entrepreneurship, ethics, equity, and Canada's Truth and Reconciliation process. Academic integrity, strategies for university success, academic regulations, engineering-related extracurricular activities. Effective oral and written technical communication: informative and persuasive presentations; resumes and job search communications; technical writing and formatting; information gathering and analysis; research documentation and referencing; the use of visual tools such as graphs, figures, and tables; e-portfolios; and technical reports. (Prerequisite: Engineering students only) (3 lecture hours and 1.5 tutorial hours weekly)

Visualization techniques, graphical communication using sketching, descriptive geometry, and computer-aided design (CAD) for orthographic projection, pictorial drawings, dimensioning, section views, and auxiliary views. Reading engineering drawings. Engineering graphics e-portfolio and CAD project to develop visualization skills and task completion skills. (Prerequisite: Engineering students only) (4.5 hours weekly)

An in-depth study of the human musculoskeletal system. Emphasis will be placed on the components of skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Joint articulations will be covered in detail. (3 lecture hours per week; 1 lab hour per week; weekly test.)

Presents the quantitative fundamentals of mechanics as they apply to movements of the human body and the sport implements it handles.

This introductory course will examine health and wellness from both a local and global perspective. Personal health and wellness will be evaluated from a physical, mental, spiritual and social perspective. Behavioural change and motivational techniques will be explored to aid in achieving a healthier lifestyle. This course will introduce various topics that impact the health and wellness of an individual including physical activity, nutrition, obesity, stress, disease prevention, high risk behaviour, health care systems, alternative medicine, violence in society and the environment. Current health and wellness issues within the community and media will also be presented.

This course surveys the psychological principles underlying cognitive techniques that can be used to improve performance and enjoyment in physical activity environments such as sport and exercise. Among the topics to be explored will be goal setting, anxiety control, and attentional focus.

This course introduces students to macro aspects of the sport industry, including the key decision-making bodies, governance structures, funding pathways, and legal considerations in the public, non-profit, and commercial sectors of sport and recreation. This course provides an overview of current industry trends and issues, while exposing students to the wide variety of career opportunities that exist in sport and recreation. Students will gain a foundational understanding of the various sport systems that work to organize and administer sport and recreation at the community, national, and international levels.

This introductory course presents an overview of the significance of physical activity and sport in Western Civilization from ancient Greece to the present by specific reference to selected topics in different eras through which the particular society may be examined. Within this framework, the relationship of physical activity and sport to such factors as economics, politics, and religion will be emphasized, as will its contribution to the culture.

An introduction to sport management as a profession and academic discipline. Special emphasis will be given to the principles associated with the management of various types of sport organizations, along with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully navigate employment in the sport industry.

This course introduces the principles of effective written communication that are essential in the diverse roles of a nursing professional. The aim is to help the learner develop the skills to accurately and reliably communicate written information in a variety of forms: personal reflections, documentation in charts/records, and scholarly writings (e.g., educational materials, abstracts, posters, journal articles, project reports). (Prerequisite: Open only to Nursing students. Corequisites: Registration in all courses required for first year fall semester) (3 lecture hours per week). 3 credits

This is the first in a series of five courses that address professional nursing practice. The learner is introduced to the roles and responsibilities of registered nurses and fundamental concepts of professional nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring the concept of health and professional nursing skills (i.e. critical thinking, therapeutic communication, evidence-informed decision-making, teaching and learning) that promote patient/client and family-centred care. (Prerequisite: Open only to Nursing students. Corequisites: Registration in all courses required for first year fall semester) (3 lecture hours per week). 3 credits

This is the first of two courses that introduce the learner to the foundations of anatomy and physiology within the context of nursing and health. Content includes an overview of the structure, function, and organization of the human body (from the cellular level, to tissues, organs, and organ systems) and review of selected organ systems such as the integumentary, nervous, endocrine, hematologic, and musculoskeletal systems. Review of systems will incorporate the anatomy and physiology of the system and its relevance, and importance to patient/client care. (Prerequisite: Open only to Nursing students. Co-requisite: Registration in all courses required for first year fall semester) (3 lecture hours per week; 2 lab hours every other week) 3 credits

This is the first in a series of seven onsite experiential learning labs in which the learner will apply theory to clinical practice through a variety of interactive and simulated activities. In this course, the learner is introduced to clinical and communication skills for the professional nurse. (Prerequisite: Open only to Nursing students.) (Corequisite: Registration in all courses required for first year fall semester) (2 hours per week) 1 credit

Principles governing living systems; the origins and diversity of life; evolution, reproduction, and heredity; the structure and function of viruses through plants and animals; basic principles of ecology. (Grade 12 "U" Biology or equivalent, or BIOL 1003 and BIOL 1013 are strongly recommended; corequisite: Chemistry CHEM 1110 or equivalent.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

This introductory course provides a foundation in microbiology relating to Nursing. Key concepts in the biology of infectious agents, human-microbe interactions, mechanisms of microbial diseases, control of microbial growth, immunology, epidemiology, and public health. (Open only to Nursing students. May not be used for credit in any Science program.) (Co-requisite: Registration in all courses required for 1st year fall semester.) (Antirequisites: BIOL-2070, BIOL-2071, BIOM-3070, BIOM-3071.) 3 credits

Introductory concepts in chemistry, including reactions of atoms, ions, and molecules; solution stoichiometry; thermochemistry; electronic structure of atoms; basic chemical bonding and molecular geometry; periodic properties of the elements; and the theory of gases. (Prerequisite: Grade 12 "U" Chemistry or equivalent (CHEM-1000), or consent of the instructor.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory/tutorial hours a week.)

Examination of the principles governing living systems, with emphasis on the molecular and cellular basis of life, molecular genetics, energetics, differentiation, and development. (Grade 12 "U" Biology or equivalent, or BIOL 1003 and BIOL 1013 are strongly recommended) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

A continuation of CHEM 1100 covering such topics as: chemical kinetics; general equilibrium theory; acid base theory; chemical thermodynamics; and introduction to organic chemistry. (Prerequisite: CHEM 1100.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory/tutorial hours a week.)

An introduction to the components of Earth's environment (geosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) and the principles and processes defining and influencing environmental systems (energy and matter cycles). Human interactions with, and influences on, the environment will be examined (resource and land use, waste and pollution, development, conservation and sustainability). This course is designed for Science majors. (3 lecture hours a week, optional field trips).

An introduction to earth's physical character and the processes that shape our planet. The focus is on the geosphere: earth materials; weathering; sedimentation; magmatism and volcanism; metamorphism; deformation; earthquakes; mountain building; and Earth's internal structure. These will be examined in the context of the origin of the Earth, geologic time, and plate tectonics. The nature of mineral and energy resources will also be examined. This course is designed for Science majors. (2 lecture, 2.5 laboratory hours a week.)

An introduction to the atmosphere and the basic principles of meteorology and climatology. Topics include weather systems, atmospheric pollution and inadvertent climate modification, climate change and relationships between climate and living organisms. (3 lecture hours a week.)

This introductory course focuses on the key elements of map design, representation of spatial data and map interpretation. Topics will include projections, datums and coordinate reference systems, scale properties and unit calculations, map symbology and map accuracy. Different mapping approaches, such as choropleth, isoline and dot mapping will be utilized throughout the course. Web-based mapping will be introduced. Maps will be designed, generated, and interpreted using paper-based media and modern cartographic software in a laboratory setting. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

The geological processes operating on or near Earth's surface and the development and evolution of erosional and depositional landforms as a result of glacial ice, permafrost, wind, running water, gravity, waves and tides, and exposure to the atmosphere. (3 lecture hours a week.)

Humans use energy and resources from our natural surroundings to live, and to develop our societies and cultures. This use has an impact on other animals and plants, and on the air, water, and land. Our impact is now so great that we are in danger of depleting or destroying many of the natural systems on which we depend. This course will examine our relationship with, and impact on, the environment: with reference to the physical, cultural, economic, political, and ethical elements. Sustainable practices will also be discussed.) Topics may include: human sustainability and population growth, aquatic and terrestrial sustainability, food and agriculture, water resources, energy production, and climate change. (Can be taken as a Social Science option) (Three lecture hours per week)

This course will survey the many disciplines of Forensic Science from the crime scene, to the laboratory, and ultimately to the courtroom. It will incorporate expertise in crime scene and death investigations including bloodstain pattern analysis, forensic pathology, entomology, and anthropology. It will also include guest speakers from the fields of forensic biology, chemistry, and pattern and impression evidence. Guest lectures by a range of practicing forensic scientists will give students direct contact with these experts, and a greater understanding of the role they play in the collection, analysis and presentation of evidence in court (3 lecture hours). This course is restricted to forensic science majors.

This is an algebra-based course intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include: the basic mechanical concepts of force, work and energy; and properties of matter, and heat, with examples and applications drawn from the modeling of biological systems. (Prerequisites: one 4 "U" mathematics course or equivalent.) (3 lecture hours a week, 2 laboratory hours and 1 tutorial hour every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS 1305, PHYS 1400.) (Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate.)

Descriptive statistics. Probability, discrete and continuous distributions. Point and interval estimation. Hypothesis testing. Goodness of fit. Contingency tables. (Prerequisite: Grade 12 "U" Advanced Level Mathematics or equivalent, or Grade 11 Functions and Relations, or Grade 11 Functions.) (Antirequisites: 02-250, 73-101, 73-102, 73-105, 73-205, and GENG 2220.) (May not be taken for credit after taking 65-250 or 65-251.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

Wave motion, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS 1400 or GENG-1110.) (3 lecture hours per week, 1 tutorial hour and 2 laboratory hours every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS-1310.) (Open to students in Engineering, Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science. Exceptions only with permission of the Head or designate.)

Mechanics; properties of matter and heat. A calculus-based course. (Prerequisites: Grade 12 "U" Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus or equivalent.) (Recommended corequisite: MATH 1720.) (3 lecture hours a week, 2 laboratory hours and 1 tutorial hour every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS 1300, PHYS 1305.) (Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within the Faculty of Science. Exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate).

This course is a continuation of PHYS-1305 intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include wave motion, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and an introduction to topics in modern physics involving the life sciences such as the quantum nature of radiation and its interaction with biomolecules, high energy radiation and radioactivity, and the statistical treatment of data. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1300 or PHYS-1400.) (3 lecture hours per week, 1 tutorial hour and 2 laboratory hours every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS-1410.) (Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate.)

This is an algebra-based course intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include the basic mechanical concepts of force, work and energy, properties of matter, and heat, with examples and applications drawn from the modeling of biological systems. This course serves as the prerequisite for PHYS-1400 and GENG-1110. Majors in Science and Majors in Engineering will not be given credit for this course. (Prerequisites: One 4U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

The course will cover straight lines, relations and functions, trigonometric functions, limits, derivatives, curve sketching, equations and inequalities, transformations, symmetry, exponential and logarithmic functions. This course serves as the prerequisite for MATH 1720 and MATH 1760. Majors in Science, majors in Engineering and students with at least 70% in Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) will not be given credit for this course. (Antirequisites: MATH 1760, or MATH 1720) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

This course will cover mathematical logic, proof methods and development of proof techniques, mathematical induction, sets, equivalence relations, partial ordering relations and functions. (Prerequisite: One of COMP 1000, MATH 1250, MATH 1260 or MATH 1270.) (2 lecture hours, 2 tutorial hours per week.)

This course will cover linear systems, matrix algebra, determinants, n-dimensional vectors, dot product, cross product, orthogonalization, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization and vector spaces. (Prerequisites: Both Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or MATH-1280.) (Antirequisites: MATH-1260, MATH-1270.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

This course is for students without Ontario Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U). The course MATH-1250 is for students with MCV4U. This course will cover vectors, three-dimensional geometry, linear systems, matrix algebra, determinants, n- dimensional vectors, dot product, cross product, orthogonalization, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization and vector spaces. (Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U).) (Antirequisites: MATH-1250, MATH-1270.) (4 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

This course will cover a review of functions, trigonometric functions and identities, transcendental functions, inverse trigonometric functions, introduction to limits, continuity, derivatives and applications, mean value theorem, indeterminate forms and l'Hôpital's rule, antiderivatives and an introduction to definite integrals. This course is for students who have taken Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) but have not taken Ontario Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U). Students who have credit for MCV4U should take MATH-1720. The course is equivalent to MATH-1720 for all prerequisite purposes. (Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 12Advanced Functions (MHF4U).) (Antirequisite: MATH-1720.) (4 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

This course will cover trigonometric functions and identities, inverse trigonometric functions, limits and continuity, derivatives and applications, mean value theorem, indeterminate forms and l'Hôpital's rule, antiderivatives and an introduction to definite integrals. This course is for students who have taken both Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Ontario Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U). Students who do not have credit for MCV4U should take MATH-1760. (Prerequisites: Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Ontario Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or MATH-1780.) (Antirequisite: MATH-1760.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

his course will cover linear systems, linear transformations, matrix algebra, determinants, vectors in Rn, dot product, orthogonalization, diagonalization, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, in the context of and with an emphasis on a broad range of applications in Science and Engineering. Students who do not have credit for MCV4U should take MATH-1260. (Prerequisite: MATH-1280 or both Ontario Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or equivalent) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week)

This course will cover antiderivatives, the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of integration, applications, improper integrals, sequences and series, convergence tests, power series, Taylor and Maclaurin series, and polar and parametric coordinates. (Prerequisite: MATH-1760 or MATH-1720.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour per week.)

An introduction to microeconomics intended to provide students with the tools necessary to begin to understand and evaluate how resources are allocated in a market economy. Specific topics include how markets function and theories of the business firm, of consumer behaviour, and of income distribution. The economic roles of labour unions and government are also covered. The theories are applied to contemporary Canadian economic problems.

This course is an introduction to macroeconomics. The emphasis is upon measuring and explaining what determines economic aggregates such as the total national product (GDP) and the level of prices and employment. The role of money and financial institutions, the impact of international trade and the policy options available to governments for coping with inflation and unemployment are discussed in detail.

Note: Suggested courses listed in this overview may be offered in the Fall, Winter or both terms. Students should check available offerings when planning and selecting courses.


If you’re having a hard time figuring out which courses to take or if you’re not sure if you’re on the right track reach out to us for help. Talk to an academic advisor if you have program specific questions, and for general inquiries you can ask.UWindsor.

Undergraduate calendar

The University of Windsor Undergraduate Calendar is your source for official information about the undergraduate academic programs and regulations of the University of Windsor.

Section Code


Indicate the specific section in which you are registering. Section codes 51 – 84 normally are reserved for laboratory sections associated with a particular lecture. In some cases, students MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR A LAB SECTION. Otherwise, labs are arranged by the department or instructor once classes have begun.

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Students must register for any two-semester course in both the Fall and Winter terms.

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Understanding Course Codes

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